Performance funding in Louisiana: a quantitative analysis of the Grad Act

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dc.contributor Major, Claire Howell
dc.contributor Webb, Alan L.
dc.contributor Katsinas, Stephen G.
dc.contributor.advisor Hardy, David E.
dc.contributor.advisor Breaux, Arleene P.
dc.contributor.author Lind, Lee E.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-04-26T14:26:00Z
dc.date.available 2017-04-26T14:26:00Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0002374
dc.identifier.other Lind_alatus_0004D_12646
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/3094
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract The funding of higher education in Louisiana has faced quite a number of challenges as recent economic forces have resulted in reduced state revenues throughout the past several years. Concurrently, and following a national trend, questions have arisen regarding the value and quality of higher education. Individual institutions, faced with reduced state appropriations and calls for accountably, have experienced further difficulty in attempting to mitigate their lost appropriations, as the structure of funding in Louisiana does not allow for increases in tuition rates without prior approval from the state legislature. In 2010, the Louisiana Granting Resources and Autonomy in Diplomas Act was passed in an effort to respond to calls for increased quality in education and to allow institutions a degree of autonomy and influence over tuition rates. The Act requires participating institutions to report and meet performance criteria at specified levels in order to receive a percentage of their state appropriations and enable the institutions the ability to have additional operational freedoms and to increase tuition by a limited percentage. Since the passage of the Act, few critical academic studies have been conducted on its outcomes. This study seeks to fill the gap in literature by quantitatively analyzing the results of the Act at Louisiana’s public 4-year, non-specialized comprehensive institutions of higher education. Student success measures, including retention rates, graduation rates, and number of completers, as well a state financial appropriations and tuition cost, were examined for change over time.
dc.format.extent 240 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Education policy
dc.subject.other Higher education
dc.subject.other Education finance
dc.title Performance funding in Louisiana: a quantitative analysis of the Grad Act
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Higher Education Administration
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ed.D.


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