Gendered racial microaggressions and black college women: A cross-sectional study of depression and psychological distress

Abstract

Objective: We assessed the association between gendered racism, the simultaneous experience of sexism and racism, depression, and psychological distress in Black college women using an intersectional instrument, the gendered racial microaggression scale.

Participants: Black college women enrolled at a predominantly white institution (PWI) in the southeastern U.S. (N=164, response rate = 77%, mean age 21.67).

Methods: We used a cross-sectional survey to explore the impact of stress appraisal and frequency of gendered racial microaggressions on depression and psychological distress using validated scales.

Results: 30% reported depression and 54% reported severe psychological distress. Correlations indicate significant relationships between gendered racism, depression and psychological distress, with the strongest relation reported between the frequency of gendered racism to depression. Regression analyses suggest significant relationships between gendered racism, depression and psychological distress.

Conclusion: Gendered racism has significant bearing on the mental health of Black college women attending a PWI. Implications for interventions are discussed.

Description
Keywords
Intersectionality, Gendered racism, Black college women
Citation
Burton, W. M., Paschal, A. M., Jaiswal, J., Leeper, J. D., & Birch, D. A. (2022). Gendered racial microaggressions and black college women: A cross-sectional study of depression and psychological distress. Journal of American College Health, 1–8. https://doi.org/10.1080/07448481.2022.2133567