Socioeconomic Status and Cardiovascular Responses to Standardized Stressors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

dc.contributor.authorBoylan, Jennifer Morozink
dc.contributor.authorCundiff, Jenny M.
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Karen A.
dc.contributor.otherChildren's Hospital Colorado
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Colorado System
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Colorado Denver
dc.contributor.otherTexas Tech University System
dc.contributor.otherTexas Tech University
dc.contributor.otherPennsylvania Commonwealth System of Higher Education (PCSHE)
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Pittsburgh
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Alabama Tuscaloosa
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-20T18:32:24Z
dc.date.available2021-04-20T18:32:24Z
dc.date.issued2018-04
dc.description.abstractObjective: Disparities in cardiovascular health by socioeconomic status (SES) are a pressing public health concern. Hypothesized mechanisms linking low SES to poor health are large cardiovascular responses to and delayed recovery from psychological stress. The current study presents a meta-analysis of the literature on the association of SES with blood pressure and heart rate reactivity to and recovery from acute stress tasks. Methods: The PubMed database was searched, and 26 unique studies with relevant data were identified (k = 25 reactivity [n = 14,617], k = 6 recovery [n = 1,324]). Results: Using random-effects models, no significant association between SES and cardiovascular reactivity to stress emerged (r = .008, 95% confidence interval = -.02 to .04), although higher SES was associated with better recovery from stress (r = -.14, 95% confidence interval -. 23 to -. 05). Stressor type moderated the reactivity effect, wherein higher SES was associated with greater reactivity to cognitive stressors (r = .036, p = .024), not with reactivity to interpersonal stressors (r = -.02, p = .62), but was associated with lower reactivity to tasks with combinations of cognitive, interpersonal, and physical challenges (r = -.12, p = .029). Accounting for publication bias revealed a significant association between SES and reactivity in the opposite direction of hypotheses. Conclusions: Cardiovascular recovery from acute stress, but not reactivity to stress, may be a key pathway between low SES and risk for cardiovascular diseases. Heterogeneity in effect size and direction, challenges related to working across temporal dynamics, and recommendations for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.citationBoylan, J., Cundiff, J., Matthews, K. (2018): Socioeconomic Status and Cardiovascular Responses to Standardized Stressors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Psychosomatic Medicine, 80(3).
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/PSY.0000000000000561
dc.identifier.urihttp://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/7548
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins
dc.subjectblood pressure
dc.subjectcardiovascular reactivity
dc.subjectcardiovascular recovery
dc.subjectheart rate
dc.subjectsocioeconomic status
dc.subjectBLOOD-PRESSURE REACTIVITY
dc.subjectRANDOM-EFFECTS MODELS
dc.subjectPSYCHOSOCIAL FACTORS
dc.subjectMENTAL STRESS
dc.subjectPSYCHOLOGICAL STRESS
dc.subjectCHILDHOOD POVERTY
dc.subjectAFRICAN-AMERICAN
dc.subjectPHYSICAL HEALTH
dc.subjectUNITED-STATES
dc.subjectRISK
dc.subjectPsychiatry
dc.subjectPsychology
dc.subjectPsychology, Multidisciplinary
dc.titleSocioeconomic Status and Cardiovascular Responses to Standardized Stressors: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysisen_US
dc.typetext
dc.typeReview
Files
Original bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Name:
Socioeconomic Status and Cardiovascular Responses to Standardized Stressors A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis_Cundiff.pdf
Size:
1.34 MB
Format:
Adobe Portable Document Format
Description:
main article
License bundle
Now showing 1 - 1 of 1
No Thumbnail Available
Name:
license.txt
Size:
1.27 KB
Format:
Item-specific license agreed upon to submission
Description: