Curved vs. Straight-Line Handwriting Effects on Word Recognition in Typical and Dyslexic Readers Across Chinese and English

dc.contributor.authorGuan, Connie Qun
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yifei
dc.contributor.authorMeng, Wanjin
dc.contributor.authorMorett, Laura M.
dc.contributor.otherBeijing Language & Culture University
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Science & Technology Beijing
dc.contributor.otherUniversity of Alabama Tuscaloosa
dc.date.accessioned2023-09-28T21:01:18Z
dc.date.available2023-09-28T21:01:18Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.description.abstractHandwriting serves to link auditory and motor routines with visual word processing, which is a hallmark of successful reading. The current study aims to explore the effect of multisensory integration as a pathway to neural specialization for print among typical and dyslexic readers across writing systems. We identified 9-10-year-old dyslexic Chinese children (n = 24) and their typically developing counterparts (n = 24) on whom we conducted both behavioral and electroencephalogram (EEG) experiments. We designed four learning conditions: Handwriting Chinese (HC), Viewing Chinese (VC), Drawing followed by Character Recognition in Chinese (D-C), and Drawing followed by Word Recognition in English (D-E). In both handwriting and drawing conditions, we also designed curved vs. straight-line stimuli. Both behavioral and EEG results showed that handwriting straight line strokes facilitated visual word recognition in Chinese compared to handwriting curved lines. Handwriting conditions resulted in a lateralization of the N170 in typical readers, but not the dyslexic readers. Interestingly, drawing curved lines facilitate word recognition in English among dyslexic readers. Taken together, the results of the study suggest benefits of handwriting on the neural processing and behavioral performance in response to Chinese character recognition and curved-line drawing effects on English word recognition among dyslexic readers. But the lack of handwriting effects in dyslexic readers suggest that students who have deficits in reading may also be missing the link between multisensory integration and word recognition in the visual word form areas. The current study results have implications for maintaining handwriting practices to promote perception and motor integration for visual word form area development for normal readers and suggest that drawing practices might benefit Chinese dyslexic readers in reading English.en_US
dc.format.mediumelectronic
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf
dc.identifier.citationGuan, C. Q., Li, Y., Meng, W., & Morett, L. M. (2021). Curved vs. Straight-Line Handwriting Effects on Word Recognition in Typical and Dyslexic Readers Across Chinese and English. In Frontiers in Psychology (Vol. 12). Frontiers Media SA. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2021.745300
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpsyg.2021.745300
dc.identifier.orcidhttps://orcid.org/0000-0002-1251-7213
dc.identifier.urihttps://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/11972
dc.languageEnglish
dc.language.isoen_US
dc.publisherFrontiers
dc.rights.licenseAttribution 4.0 International (CC BY 4.0)
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjecthandwriting
dc.subjectdrawing
dc.subjectvisual word recognition
dc.subjectN170
dc.subjectlaterality
dc.subjectChinese
dc.subjectEnglish
dc.subjectEARLY ELECTROPHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSE
dc.subjectBRAIN ACTIVITY
dc.subjectTIME-COURSE
dc.subjectCHILDREN
dc.subjectPERCEPTION
dc.subjectEXPERTISE
dc.subjectEXPERIENCE
dc.subjectMOTOR
dc.subjectERP
dc.subjectPsychology, Multidisciplinary
dc.titleCurved vs. Straight-Line Handwriting Effects on Word Recognition in Typical and Dyslexic Readers Across Chinese and Englishen_US
dc.typeArticle
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