The Effects of Grit and Social Support on Athlete Burnout and Well-Being in Female Collegiate Student-Athletes

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Date
2022
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University of Alabama Libraries
Abstract

Psychological concerns such as athlete burnout and diminished well-being have become an increasing problem collegiate student-athletes are faced with due to substantial academic and athletic demands. The first purpose of this study was to determine if the association exists between athlete burnout and well-being in female collegiate student-athletes. The second purpose was to determine if grit and social support have a main or buffering-effect on well-being and athlete burnout in female college student-athletes. The study utilized a quantitative, cross-sectional design through the administration of a web-based survey. A convenience sample of 174 NCAA Division I, female collegiate student-athletes from one Southeastern institution was utilized for the study. A correlation analysis presented a significant negative, moderate correlation (r=-0.58, p<0.001) between athlete burnout and well-being. Social support was a significant predictor for reduced sense of accomplishment (F (1,172)=68.32, p<0.001), physical and emotional exhaustion (F(1,172)=22.00, p<0.001), and sport devaluation (F(1,172)=56.51, p<0.001). Esteem support was identified as the most influential predictor of the components of athlete burnout. Social support was a significant predictor of well-being (F (1,172)=115.3, p<0.001). Emotional, esteem, and tangible support were presented as the most significant predictors of well-being. Grit was a significant predictor for reduced sense of accomplishment (F(1,712)=20.40, p<0.001), physical and emotional exhaustion (F(1,172)=28.25, p<0.001), and sport devaluation (F(1,172)=40.32, p<0.001). Both constructs were significant predictors of physical and emotional exhaustion and sport devaluation; however, perseverance of effort was the most influential predictor of reduced sense of accomplishment. Grit was a significant predictor of well-being (F (1,172)=29.68, p<0.001). Perseverance of effort was identified as the most influential predictor of well-being. The results of a moderated regression analysis yielded a significant interaction effect identified that the relationship between sport devaluation and well-being was moderated by social support (F(1,172)=5.238, p=0.023); however, none of the other interactions were significant. The moderated regression with grit did not reveal significant results. Findings of this study provide new information on considerations for reducing athlete burnout and improving well-being in female collegiate student-athletes. Health promotion researchers and stakeholders should consider the use of social support and grit in mitigating athlete burnout and diminished well-being while continuing to explore their effectiveness.

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Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
Keywords
athlete burnout, grit, Mental health, Social support, Well-being
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