The consequences of reversing trust or not reversing trust

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dc.contributor Scofield, Jason M.
dc.contributor Thoma, Stephen
dc.contributor Jeon, Hyun-Joo
dc.contributor.advisor Scofield, Jason M.
dc.contributor.author Leslie, Alicia Deanna
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T14:36:18Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T14:36:18Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0000411
dc.identifier.other Leslie_alatus_0004M_10478
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/916
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Young children often rely on the testimony of others. However, children tend to be selective about which sources they trust. For example, some children will reverse trust when a trusted speaker proves unreliable, suggesting that 4-year-olds use a speaker's current testimony to help make decisions about the trustworthiness of that speaker's past testimony (Scofield & Behrend, 2008). The current study was designed to determine why some children are able to reverse trust and why some are not. The results indicated that trust reversers tended to believe that the unreliable speaker was no longer trustworthy. The results also indicated that trust non-reversers varied by age, with 3-year-olds tending to believe that the unreliable speaker was trustworthy and 4- and 5-year-olds tending to believe that the unreliable speaker was no longer trustworthy, though they did have difficulty correcting past misinformation. Overall, results suggested that most children believe that an unreliable speaker is no longer trustworthy for new information.
dc.format.extent 34 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Education, Early Childhood
dc.subject.other Behavioral Sciences
dc.title The consequences of reversing trust or not reversing trust
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Human Development and Family Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Human Development and Family Studies
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level master's
etdms.degree.name M.S.


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