Knowledge, engagement, and perceptions of the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for cardiovascular physical activity: a university undergraduate comparison

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dc.contributor Leeper, James D.
dc.contributor Wright, Kenneth E.
dc.contributor Umstattd, M. Renee
dc.contributor.advisor Usdan, Stuart L.
dc.contributor.advisor Turner, Lori W.
dc.contributor.author Brown, George Milton
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-28T22:30:32Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-28T22:30:32Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0000349
dc.identifier.other Brown_alatus_0004D_10437
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/855
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Background: The early onset of chronic disease is a major health concern facing the nation. Leading health indicators support physical activity to reduce the mortality and morbidity rates among individuals. The college years represent a time of transition and potential for improved adherence to positive health behaviors. As institutions of higher education seek to improve retention through positive health behavior, an increase in attention to physical activity is warranted. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge, engagement and perceptions of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) guidelines for cardiovascular physical activity among university freshmen and seniors. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used to survey all University of Alabama undergraduate students (N=21,775). A 26-question electronic survey was used to collect data. Results: A total of 877 surveys were returned representing a four percent (4.0%) response rate. The mean knowledge scores were 4.26 (out of possible 8.0). Students engaged in moderate intensity physical activity on less (M=3.73) days per week than recommended by the ACSM. For vigorous intensity physical activity students reported engagement on more (M=4.06) days per week than recommended by the ACSM. Knowledge of physical activity guidelines was a significant predictor of engagement in vigorous intensity physical activity for both freshmen (n=216, p=.040) and seniors (n=211, p=.016). Significant differences (p=.047) by year in school were found with respect to walking activity where freshman walked more often than seniors. Age (p=.012), race (p<.001) and year in school (P=.047) were all significant with respect to moderate intensity physical activity. Males engaged in more vigorous intensity physical activity than females (p=.003). When examining physical among classes, freshman students reported significant differences in engagement to vigorous intensity physical activity based on the constructs of perceived self-efficacy (p<.001) and perceived barriers (p=.006). Seniors reported significant differences in engagement to vigorous intensity physical activity based on perceived benefits (p=.002) and perceived severity (p=.019). Discussion: University freshman and seniors vary in reasons for engagement in physical activity. While knowledge is not synonymous with engagement it does have an impact on a student's overall decision and understanding of the health benefits of physical activity.
dc.format.extent 236 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Health Sciences, Education
dc.title Knowledge, engagement, and perceptions of the American College of Sports Medicine guidelines for cardiovascular physical activity: a university undergraduate comparison
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Health Science
etdms.degree.discipline Health Education/Promotion
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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