Parental Knowledge in Screening for Autism

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Barber, Angela
dc.contributor Hart, William
dc.contributor Salekin, Randall
dc.contributor Xia, Mengya
dc.contributor.advisor Tomeny, Theodore S
dc.contributor.author Rankin, James Alexander
dc.date.accessioned 2022-04-13T20:34:14Z
dc.date.available 2022-04-13T20:34:14Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.other http://purl.lib.ua.edu/182105
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0004258
dc.identifier.other Rankin_alatus_0004D_14069
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/8437
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Timely diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is vitally important for improving the prognosis of young children with this condition. One of the greatest challenges facing healthcare providers for individuals with ASD and their families is shortening the time between when symptoms first appear and when an assessment for ASD is conducted. Current practice guidelines suggest pediatric screening should occur before 24 months of age for all children to help in detecting ASD as early as possible. Currently, screeners such as the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers – Revised (M-CHAT-R) have been developed and validated for use in primary care settings. However, an underlying assumption behind screeners such as the M-CHAT-R is that parents are able to adequately understand the items on a screener questionnaire and relate those items back to their child’s behavior. Using an item response theory framework, the current study found that the majority of behaviors characteristic of ASD assessed during the screening process are easy or very easy for parents to correctly identify. This study also found that greater parental knowledge of both child development norms and knowledge of ASD helped parents to accurately identify symptoms of ASD, but only when these symptoms were severe. Results of the current study help to highlight a fundamental divide in screening wherein more severe cases of ASD are well captured by current screening measures, but mild, less severe cases of ASD may require closer examination in future studies on screening accuracy.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Autism
dc.subject.other MCHAT
dc.subject.other Screening
dc.title Parental Knowledge in Screening for Autism
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Clinical psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account