Toward Tailored Interventions: Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Functioning Predicts Responses to an Intervention for Conduct Problems Delivered in Two Formats

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dc.contributor.author Glenn, Andrea
dc.contributor.author Lochman, John E.
dc.contributor.author Dishion, Thomas
dc.contributor.author Powell, Nicole P.
dc.contributor.author Boxmeyer, Caroline
dc.contributor.author Kassing, Francesca
dc.contributor.author Qu, Lixin
dc.contributor.author Romero, Devon
dc.date.accessioned 2021-06-23T18:26:38Z
dc.date.available 2021-06-23T18:26:38Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.citation Glenn, A., Lochman, J., Dishion, T., Powell, N., Boxmeyer, C., Kassing, F., Qu, L., Romero, D. (2018): Toward Tailored Interventions: Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Functioning Predicts Responses to an Intervention for Conduct Problems Delivered in Two Formats. Prevention Science, Volume 20. en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/7797
dc.description.abstract Coping Power is an evidence-based preventive intervention for youth with aggressive behavior problems that has traditionally been delivered in small group formats, but because of concerns about potentially diminished effects secondary to aggregation of high risk youth, an individual format of Coping Power has been developed. The current study examined whether physiological characteristics of the child may provide information about which intervention delivery format works best for that individual. Indicators of sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system functioning were examined in 360 fourth-grade children (65% male; 76.4% selfreported African-American) who were randomly assigned to Group Coping Power (GCP) or Individual Coping Power (ICP) (Lochman et al., 2015). Longitudinal assessments of teacher- and parent-reported proactive and reactive aggression were collected through a one-year follow-up. For children with higher initial levels of aggression, those with lower parasympathetic functioning at pre-intervention showed greater reductions in teacher-rated proactive aggression in the ICP condition than the GCP condition. For children with high parasympathetic functioning, there was no differential effect of intervention format. Regardless of intervention format, youth with lower levels of sympathetic functioning at pre-intervention demonstrated greater reductions in teacher-rated proactive aggression. These findings suggest that physiological indicators may be worth considering in future studies examining which youth respond best to specific types of interventions. en_US
dc.description.uri https://doi.org/10.1007/s11121-017-0859-0
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English en_US
dc.subject skin conductance en_US
dc.subject respiratory sinus arrhythmia en_US
dc.subject aggression en_US
dc.subject conduct problems en_US
dc.subject intervention en_US
dc.subject physiology en_US
dc.title Toward Tailored Interventions: Sympathetic and Parasympathetic Functioning Predicts Responses to an Intervention for Conduct Problems Delivered in Two Formats en_US
dc.type text


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