Race and the Local Politics of Punishment in the New World of Welfare

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dc.contributor.author Fording, Richard C.
dc.contributor.author Soss, Joe
dc.contributor.author Schram, Sanford F.
dc.coverage.spatial United States en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2021-05-24T18:57:33Z
dc.date.available 2021-05-24T18:57:33Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.citation Fording, R., Soss, J., Schram, S. (2011): Race and the Local Politics of Punishment in the New World of Welfare. American Journal of Sociology, 116(5). en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/7731
dc.description.abstract To illuminate how race affects the usage of punitive tools in policy implementation settings, we analyze sanctions imposed for noncompliant client behavior under welfare reform. Drawing on a model of racial classification and policy choice, we test four hypotheses regarding client race, local context, and sanctioning. Based on longitudinal and cross-sectional multilevel analyses of individual-level administrative data, we find that race plays a significant role in shaping sanction implementation. Its effects, however, are highly contingent on client characteristics, local political contexts, and the degree to which state governments devolve policy control to local officials. en_US
dc.description.uri https://doi.org/10.1086/657525
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English en_US
dc.subject.lcsh Public welfare en US
dc.subject.lcsh Race discrimination en_US
dc.title Race and the Local Politics of Punishment in the New World of Welfare en_US
dc.type text


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