Codependency among nurses: a comparison by substance use disorder and other selected variables

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dc.contributor Burnham, Joy J.
dc.contributor Leggett, Mark F.
dc.contributor Stinnett, Nick
dc.contributor Rice, Margaret L.
dc.contributor.advisor Satcher, Jamie
dc.contributor.author Self, Jo Simmons
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-28T22:25:24Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-28T22:25:24Z
dc.date.issued 2010
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0000250
dc.identifier.other Self_alatus_0004D_10310
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/756
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Previous studies have shown that the profession of nursing has inherent risk factors that may contribute to Substance Use Disorder among nurses. One of those risk factors may be codependency. This study explored the relationship between codependency and self-reported history of treatment for SUD among nurses. It also compared nurses' codependency scores by gender, race, birth order, having experienced or witnessed physical violence in the family of origin, having a parent or primary caregiver with SUD, and having a parent or primary caregiver with a history of mental illness. One thousand nurses with active licensure in a southeastern state were mailed survey packets which included the Spann-Fischer Codependency Scale and a demographic questionnaire. Two hundred and two surveys were returned. The results indicated that the nurses' codependency scores differed significantly when compared by history of treatment for SUD. Nurses who reported treatment for SUD had higher codependency scores than nurses who reported no treatment for SUD. The nurses also differed significantly in their codependency scores when compared by their having witnessed or experienced physical violence in their family of origin. Those who reported a history of witnessing or experiencing physical violence in their family of origin had higher codependency scores than those who did not. The third significant finding was that nurses who reported having a parent or primary caregiver with a history of mental illness had higher codependency scores than those who did not.
dc.format.extent 83 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Counseling Psychology
dc.title Codependency among nurses: a comparison by substance use disorder and other selected variables
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Educational Studies in Psychology, Research Methodology, and Counseling
etdms.degree.discipline Counselor Education
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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