Saturday versus Sunday: differences in how fanship and fandom is performed through social media for professional and college football fans

Show simple item record

dc.contributor Brown, Kenon A.
dc.contributor Leeper, James D.
dc.contributor Parrott, Scott
dc.contributor Sadri, Sean R.
dc.contributor.advisor Billings, Andrew C.
dc.contributor.author Abdallah, James Charles
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-30T17:24:52Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-30T17:24:52Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003616
dc.identifier.other Abdallah_alatus_0004D_14130
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/7015
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract This dissertation compared college football and NFL fans regarding social media consumption and production utilizing a social identity approach. More specifically, the degree to which team identification and fan identification played a role in the social media use of both groups was analyzed. A total of 586 fans who scored either 1-4 or 8-11 on an 11-point scale responded to a survey that examined respondent’s team and fan identification, as well as social media consumption, creation, and sharing behaviors. Results indicated that college football fans generally identified with fellow fans of their favorite football team and consumed, created, and shared social media more frequently and with greater intensity than their NFL counterparts. Team identification and fan identification were both positive predictors of social media consumption, creation, and sharing among football fans in general, while there were some differences in these predictors between college football and NFL fans. Key differences included fan identification predicted social media consumption and creation, while team identification predicted social media sharing among both college and NFL fans. This study was one of the first to examine two different levels of fans of the same sport and how social media use differed between the two groups. Theoretical contributions to the social identity approach and practical implications of the findings concerning media psychology and sport psychology are also given.
dc.format.extent 113 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Communication
dc.title Saturday versus Sunday: differences in how fanship and fandom is performed through social media for professional and college football fans
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. College of Communication and Information Sciences
etdms.degree.discipline Communication & Information Sciences
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account