Telecoaching in early intervention: supporting professionals and families of toddlers with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder

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dc.contributor Barber, Angela B.
dc.contributor McLeod, Ragan H.
dc.contributor Swoszowski, I. Nicole C.
dc.contributor Watkins, Laci
dc.contributor.advisor McWilliam, Robert A.
dc.contributor.author Tomeny, Kimberly Resua
dc.date.accessioned 2020-09-30T17:23:49Z
dc.date.available 2020-09-30T17:23:49Z
dc.date.issued 2020
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003574
dc.identifier.other Tomeny_alatus_0004D_14114
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/6973
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Young children with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) should receive early intervention services to achieve optimal outcomes, and recommended practices in early intervention reflect family centeredness, contextual learning in routines and natural environments, and supports for caregivers via a caregiver-implemented approach to intervention. Increasing evidence demonstrates gaps between recommended and actual practices in early intervention and in services for children with ASD, and discrepancies often exist between professionals’ perceptions of their practice and their actual practice, potentially contributing to an implementation gap. Distance coaching via technology, or telecoaching, has become an increasingly viable method of supporting professionals’ use of best practices in early intervention/early childhood special education (EI/ECSE). Although studies have examined the implementation of different telecoaching methods with various early childhood professionals, limited research has explored the use of telecoaching with early intervention professionals (EI professionals) in the community. The present study used a mixed-methods design to examine differences between EI professionals’ reported and actual practices and to examine bug-in-ear telecoaching versus video review telecoaching to support EI professionals’ use of recommended practices when working with families of toddlers with or at risk for ASD in early intervention. Results showed that EI professionals reported higher quality practices than they were observed using, and telecoaching is a promising, community-viable intervention to support EI professionals’ use of recommended practices.
dc.format.extent 229 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Special education
dc.subject.other Early childhood education
dc.title Telecoaching in early intervention: supporting professionals and families of toddlers with or at risk for autism spectrum disorder
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Special Education and Muliple Abilities
etdms.degree.discipline Special Education
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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