Characterological self-blame and victimization among adolescents

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dc.contributor Parker, Jeffrey G.
dc.contributor Barth, Joan
dc.contributor.advisor McDonald, Kristina L.
dc.contributor.author Yang, Joo Young
dc.date.accessioned 2020-03-12T18:06:36Z
dc.date.available 2020-03-12T18:06:36Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003543
dc.identifier.other Yang_alatus_0004M_14031
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/6685
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Peer victimization has numerous negative consequences for adolescent adjustment, including anxiety and depression (Reijntjes, Kamphuis, Prinzie & Telch, 2010). To effectively intervene and help victims of peer harassment, it is crucial to understand how victims make sense of their experience. One way that children and adolescents make sense out of victimization is to make characterological self-blame attributions. Characterological self-blame attributions are attributions that are stable, internal, and uncontrollable (i.e. “there is something wrong with me that I can’t change,” “I’m not cool enough”) and these attributions seem to account, in part, for the relation between peer victimization and internalizing problems (Graham & Juvonen, 1998). However, past studies have found that marginalization, as operationalized as being from a racial/ethnic numerical minority group in a low diversity school, moderates how peer victimization is not related to characterological self-blame (Graham, Bellmore, Nishina & Juvonen, 2009). Graham et al. (2009) suggested that one way to explain this is the possibility that that marginalized students attribute victimization to the prejudice of others. The current study found that characterological self-blame mediated the relationship between victimization and internalizing problems. This link between victimization and characterological self-blame was moderated by attributions of prejudice. Results imply the importance of promoting healthier attributional styles to attenuate negative consequences of victimization on adjustment.
dc.format.extent 71 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Developmental psychology
dc.subject.other Psychology
dc.title Characterological self-blame and victimization among adolescents
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level master's
etdms.degree.name M.A.


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