Teaching presence and engagement behaviors in an online computer applications course: a theoretical framework and empirical analysis

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dc.contributor Benson, Angela
dc.contributor McMath, Juanita
dc.contributor Major, Claire
dc.contributor.advisor Rice, Margaret
dc.contributor.advisor Wright, Vivian
dc.contributor.author McNeill, Laura J.
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-16T15:03:46Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-16T15:03:46Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003425
dc.identifier.other McNeill_alatus_0004D_13865
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/6482
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Academic research has consistently shown effective teacher presence to be a significant factor in student satisfaction, engagement, perceived learning, and sense of community. The need for effective teaching presence remains of significant importance, particularly with the vast growth of online courses and online degree programs. It is, therefore, also necessary to evaluate the instruments used to measure effective teaching presence. The purpose of this dissertation was an examination of the construct validity of a survey instrument developed to assess effective online teaching presence. This dissertation also assessed how well the construct validity of the teaching presence instrument fit the ICAP framework of observable student engagement behaviors. Data included teaching presence survey results from undergraduate students enrolled at a large research university in the United States. It also included students’ aggregate course time and log in frequency as measured by the Blackboard LMS. No demographic data were collected, other than gender, which did not reveal significant data in the study. The study found that the teaching presence instrument did not measure the teaching presence construct as intended. The study also found that the construct validity of the teaching presence instrument did not fit the ICAP framework of observable student engagement behaviors. An examination of the aggregate Blackboard data revealed fewer total course hours and fewer course log in frequencies for activities requiring more cognitive ability.
dc.format.extent 133 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Educational technology
dc.subject.other Instructional design
dc.subject.other Higher education
dc.title Teaching presence and engagement behaviors in an online computer applications course: a theoretical framework and empirical analysis
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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