The succcesses and challenges of African American student affairs administrators in predominantly white institutions in the southeastern United States

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dc.contributor Laanan, Frankie
dc.contributor Bray, Nathaniel
dc.contributor Mobley, Steven
dc.contributor McHargh, Carlton
dc.contributor.advisor Erevelles, Nirmala
dc.contributor.author Sutton, Allen
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-16T15:03:44Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-16T15:03:44Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003421
dc.identifier.other Sutton_alatus_0004D_13976
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/6478
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract This study explored the experiences, successes, and challenges of African American student affairs administrators at six institutions within the southeastern United States. Using a purposeful sample of eight full time African American student affairs administrators from various institutions with completely different makeups concerning their student population and the number of African American student affairs administrators at each institution. The study revealed important themes that emerged from analysis of interview transcripts to explain the experiences, successes, and challenges in a predominantly White institution in the southeastern United States. Specifically, the study addresses the strategies used by the African American male student affairs administrators to survive or thrive within a space that is not created with them in mind. By exploring the day-to-day experiences of African American male student affairs administrators, this study also sought to give predominantly White institutions an opportunity to gain information on how to retain and recruit this population. The conceptual frameworks that guided this study, Critical Race Theory and Cultural Community Wealth Theory focused on the many different variables that influence, negatively and positively, the African American male student affairs administrators within predominantly White institutions in the southeastern United States. Further, the study explored the experiences, successes, and challenges of African American administrators working at a predominantly White institution as suggested from a review of literature. There are very few resources regarding this population, thus, making this study a necessity in ensuring that they are successful within their positions.
dc.format.extent 193 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Educational administration
dc.subject.other African American studies
dc.subject.other Educational leadership
dc.title The succcesses and challenges of African American student affairs administrators in predominantly white institutions in the southeastern United States
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ed.D.


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