The effect of executive function deficits on treatment response in children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder

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dc.contributor Gilpin, Ansley
dc.contributor Barth, Joan
dc.contributor McDonald, Kristina
dc.contributor.advisor Jarret, Matthew
dc.contributor.author King, Savannah Lee
dc.date.accessioned 2020-01-16T15:03:43Z
dc.date.available 2020-01-16T15:03:43Z
dc.date.issued 2019
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003419
dc.identifier.other King_alatus_0004M_13895
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/6476
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Oppositional Defiant Disorder (ODD) occurs in childhood and is characterized by recurrent, developmentally inappropriate, negativistic, defiant, disobedient, and hostile behaviors directed towards authority figures. Such behaviors can significantly interfere with child-peer and child-adult interactions. If left untreated, ODD can result in social, emotional, and academic consequences throughout childhood and into adulthood. Behavioral and cognitive-behavioral interventions such as parent management training (PMT) and collaborative and proactive solutions (CPS) have been shown to be effective treatments for ODD. Previous studies have not yet investigated the role that executive functioning (EF) deficits play in treatment response for ODD symptomology. Since EF deficits often co-occur with ODD, it is important to consider whether those with such deficits respond differently to PMT and CPS, particularly given that an approach such as CPS relies more on EF skills than PMT. No study to date has examined whether EF deficits differentially predict treatment response to PMT or CPS. The current study investigated whether pre-treatment EF deficits predict differential response to treatment as indexed by a reduction in ODD symptoms. We hypothesized that pre-treatment levels of EF would influence treatment response such that those with greater EF deficits at baseline would not see as great a reduction in ODD symptoms in the CPS condition, while EF deficits would not affect response to PMT.
dc.format.extent 41 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Psychology
dc.title The effect of executive function deficits on treatment response in children with Oppositional Defiant Disorder
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level master's
etdms.degree.name M.A.


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