Predictors of coping success in children with functional abdominal pain: the influence of executive function and attention regulation

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dc.contributor Klinger, Laura G.
dc.contributor Madan-Swain, Avi
dc.contributor Thorn, Beverly E.
dc.contributor Roskos-Ewoldsen, David R.
dc.contributor.advisor Lochman, John E.
dc.contributor.author Hocking, Matthew
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-28T22:21:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-02-28T22:21:38Z
dc.date.issued 2009
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0000123
dc.identifier.other Hocking_alatus_0004D_10166
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/630
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Theoretical models of adjustment to chronic illness underscore the influence of executive function and attention regulation in children's coping attempts, yet few studies have investigated the relations between these neurocognitive variables, coping and adjustment. This study examined the role of executive function and attention regulation in coping and its effect on pain and functional disability in 44 children and adolescents with functional abdominal pain. Participants and their caregivers completed measures of executive function, attention regulation, coping, and several outcome variables including pain, functional disability, and anxiety. Results revealed significant relations between selective attention abilities and two different approaches to coping with the stressor of abdominal pain episodes. Executive function and attention regulation did not directly or indirectly affect levels of pain or functional disability. Support was found for the indirect effects of selective attention on anxiety through cognitive coping strategies. This study highlights the role of neurocognitive variables in coping and provides a framework for future research.
dc.format.extent 128 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Psychology, Clinical
dc.title Predictors of coping success in children with functional abdominal pain: the influence of executive function and attention regulation
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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