Towards a genre of return in the contemporary Central American novel

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dc.contributor Bunker, Steven
dc.contributor Corbalán, Ana
dc.contributor Moody, Sarah
dc.contributor Worden, William
dc.contributor.advisor Janiga-Perkins, Constance
dc.contributor.author Roberts, Seth
dc.date.accessioned 2019-02-12T14:31:38Z
dc.date.available 2019-02-12T14:31:38Z
dc.date.issued 2018
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0003224
dc.identifier.other Roberts_alatus_0004D_13681
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/5407
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract This dissertation examines exile in four contemporary Central American novels and focuses on the return of each protagonist after an extended absence. The works establish homecoming as a critical feature of Central American literature and include El asco by Horacio Castellanos Moya, Cruz de olvido by Carlos Cortés, El retorno de los mayas by Gaspar Pedro González, and Con pasión absoluta by Carol Zardetto. The aim of this dissertation is to demonstrate that return represents a significant yet often underappreciated aspect of displacement in literature and criticism. The motivations for each character’s flight and eventual trip home are unique, and the distinctiveness of each path is mirrored in the various responses to the experience. The novels also approach return from differences of class, race, and gender that inform the perspectives and outcomes of each journey. Return is a dynamic process that contrasts memories of origins with the sudden encounter with an altered home. An important factor is the underlying tension between what was left behind and the people or places that appear unfamiliar after an extended absence. These journeys and their aftermaths spark difficult encounters and myriad obstacles. This dissertation establishes that exile and its repercussions do not cease once displacement comes to an end. The protagonists defy the assumption that exiles will seamlessly reengage with long-absent communities. In each novel, return is only the first step in a succession of trials and self-discoveries that reflect the tumultuous postwar era in Central America.
dc.format.extent 189 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Latin American literature
dc.title Towards a genre of return in the contemporary Central American novel
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Department of Modern Languages and Classics
etdms.degree.discipline Spanish
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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