Photodissociation of Water and O(3PJ) Formation on a Lunar Impact Melt Breccia

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dc.contributor.author DeSimone, Alice J.
dc.contributor.author Orlando, Thomas M.
dc.date.accessioned 2018-10-24T13:53:46Z
dc.date.available 2018-10-24T13:53:46Z
dc.date.issued 2014-04-30
dc.identifier.citation DeSimone, A., Orland, T. (2014): Photodissociation of Water and O(3 PJ) Formation on a Lunar Impact Melt Breccia. Journal of Geophysical Research, 119(4). DOI: https://doi.org/10.1002/2013JE004598 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/4093
dc.description.abstract Photodissociation of water deposited on an impact melt breccia collected during Apollo 16 was studied by measuring O(3PJ = 2,1,0) photoproducts detected with resonance‐enhanced multiphoton ionization. For each spin‐orbit state, the oxygen atom time‐of‐flight (TOF) spectrum was measured as a function of H2O exposure and 157 nm irradiation time. Four Maxwell‐Boltzmann distributions with translational temperatures of 10,000 K, 1800 K, 400 K, and 102 K were required to fit the data. The most likely formation mechanisms are molecular hydrogen elimination following ion‐electron recombination, secondary recombination of hydroxyl radicals, and photodissociation of adsorbed hydroxyls. The irradiation time required to reach maximum oxygen signal suggests that water clusters into islands when adsorbing on the lunar impact melt breccia. After enough irradiation for the oxygen atom yield to reach its maximum, the slowly decreasing signal was fit with an exponential curve to obtain a cross section that represents the rate of surface hydroxyl depletion. For 0.1, 1, and 5 Langmuir (1 L = 10−6 Torr s) H2O exposure, respectively, the measured O(3P) depletion cross sections were 4.9 × 10−20, 6.6 × 10−20, and 4.6 × 10−20 cm2. These results imply that photodissociation of water on the lunar surface cannot account for the large mass‐16 (±1 amu) signal observed in the lunar atmosphere. Unless another significant source of oxygen atoms is present, this unexpectedly large signal is likely due to CH4 or OH. en_US
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en_US
dc.subject atomic oxygen en_US
dc.subject lunar en_US
dc.subject photodissociation en_US
dc.subject Moon en_US
dc.subject water en_US
dc.title Photodissociation of Water and O(3PJ) Formation on a Lunar Impact Melt Breccia en_US
dc.type text en_US


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