Partial helplessness conditioning as a possible etiological factor in psychopathy

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dc.contributor Siegel, Paul S.
dc.contributor Rickard, Henry C.
dc.contributor.author Johnson, Tucker Dunlap
dc.date.accessioned 2018-05-31T16:53:19Z
dc.date.available 2018-05-31T16:53:19Z
dc.date.issued 1989
dc.identifier.uri http://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/3496
dc.description.abstract The clinical syndrome characterized by chronic antisocial behavior is variously known as psychopathy, sociopathy, and antisocial personality disorder. The entrenched behavior patterns that hallmark this disorder result in numerous costs to society, not the least of which is criminal activity. Prevalence estimates of psychopathy within the prison population range as high as 75 percent (Mawson & Mawson, 1977); yet some investigators (e.g., Cleckley, 1976) maintain that many psychopaths are ingenious enough to avoid penal confinement. Thus these psychopaths continue unhindered in their unlawful exploits, while their incarcerated counterparts occupy expensive prisons.
dc.format.extent 241
dc.format.medium Electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.hasversion Johnson, TD. Partial helplessness conditioning as a possible etiological factor in psychopathy. Ph.D. Dissertation, The University of Alabama, 1989.
dc.title Partial helplessness conditioning as a possible etiological factor in psychopathy en_US
dc.type Dissertation
dc.type Text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level Doctorate
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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