Predicting student departure: academic integration and other factors that predict departure among nontraditional students at a commuter university

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dc.contributor Breaux, Arleene P.
dc.contributor Exley, Robert
dc.contributor Hardy, David E.
dc.contributor Simmons, Alicia
dc.contributor.advisor Bray, Nathaniel J.
dc.contributor.author Rosier, John Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-02T19:54:55Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-02T19:54:55Z
dc.date.issued 2016
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0002467
dc.identifier.other Rosier_alatus_0004D_12966
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/2756
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to test a predictive model that identified variables that predict departure among nontraditional students at a commuter institution. This study explored Braxton et al. (2004) theory of student departure in commuter colleges and universities, particularly proposition 13 which states that student entry characteristics affect the level of initial commitment to the institution. In addition, this study focused on student entry characteristics, initial commitment and academic integration among nontraditional students in an effort to understand the declining enrollment and problematic retention rates associated with the study institution. The study institution is a regional, comprehensive university with approximately half of the student body considered nontraditional. Roughly 20% of the students live on campus, meeting the Carnegie classification for a commuter institution. Data from the study institution's student information system and National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) was used to gather the data necessary for the study design. NSSE provided the "initial commitment" and "academic integration" variables. The "departure" variable was collected from the beginning of the student’s entry through Spring 2016. This means for every student, at least three years of post-entry data was collected to determine either current enrollment or graduation. If neither was evident, the student departed prior to graduation. Major findings of the study showed that: (1) age, academic performance (ACT) and the entry year of the students effected initial commitment among first-year students and (2) age and two academic integration variables ("best work" and "writing clearly") effected departure among nontraditional students.
dc.format.extent 153 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Higher education administration
dc.title Predicting student departure: academic integration and other factors that predict departure among nontraditional students at a commuter university
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ed.D.


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