Social influences on autonomic arousal in autism spectrum disorders

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dc.contributor Barber, Angela B.
dc.contributor Scofield, Jason M.
dc.contributor Hay-McCutcheon, Marcia
dc.contributor Saffo, Rachel W.
dc.contributor.advisor Buhr, Anthony P.
dc.contributor.author Turner, Carolyn Kate
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T17:36:38Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T17:36:38Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0002071
dc.identifier.other Turner_alatus_0004M_11917
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/2458
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract The purpose of this study was to gain new understanding of autonomic nervous system (ANS) dysfunction in familiar and unfamiliar social situations in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Both Children with ASD and typically developing peers viewed three sets of stimuli on a computer screen: 1) a screensaver (initial and final baseline), 2) objects moving to music (attention), and 3) narratives produced by both a caregiver and a stranger (familiar and unfamiliar social situations). Physiological measures of heart rate and skin conductance were acquired to assess ANS functioning. It was expected that 1) ANS activity would differ between children with ASD and typically developing peers at baseline, 2) differences in ANS activity between the two groups would be greater in the attention vs. the baseline task, and 3) differences in ANS activity between the two groups would be greater in the unfamiliar vs. the familiar tasks. Results showed that sympathetic, but not parasympathetic, arousal was greater for children with ASD as compared to typically developing children, but these measures did not differ across tasks. Results are interpreted to suggest that children with ASD perceived the experimental conditions as more challenging as compared to children who are typically developing.
dc.format.extent 65 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Speech therapy
dc.title Social influences on autonomic arousal in autism spectrum disorders
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Communicative Disorders
etdms.degree.discipline Speech Language Pathology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level master's
etdms.degree.name M.S.


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