College students information management with parents and moral judgment development

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dc.contributor Tomek, Sara
dc.contributor Scofield, Jason M.
dc.contributor Raju, Dheeraj
dc.contributor.advisor Thoma, Stephen
dc.contributor.advisor Houser, Rick
dc.contributor.author Collin, Brian G.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T17:21:46Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T17:21:46Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0001767
dc.identifier.other Collin_alatus_0004D_12152
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/2213
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract The initial purpose of the current research study was to investigate if college students' current and perceived changes from high school in parental disclosure, secrecy, current information management strategies, and justifications for non-disclosure differed by information type, gender, college experience, and levels of moral judgment development. 256 college students completed questionnaires that assessed the parental communication variables listed along with the Defining Issues Test (DIT-2), an assessment of moral judgment development. College students were most likely to disclose and tell the whole story when parents asked about academics and religious/political views in comparison to the other sampled behaviors. In contrast, subjects were most secretive about risky behaviors and more likely to avoid discussion or omit important details when parents asked about them than the other behaviors. Subjects reported that when they did not disclose risky behaviors it was most likely to avoid punishment or parent disapproval, whereas subjects' most common justification for non-disclosure of academics was to avoid their own feelings of shame and embarrassment. In contrast, privacy was the most common justification for non-disclosure for peer, personal, multi-faceted issues, or religious-political views. Overall, females were less secretive than males, more likely to disclose to the mother, tell the whole story when asked, and less likely to make up a story/lie or avoid discussion when asked about the sampled behaviors. However, collegiate females perceived greater decreases in disclosure of risky behaviors than did males, and in turn they were no more likely than males to tell the whole story when asked about them. As expected, cognitive moral development scores were also positively associated with disclosure to the mother about academics, telling the whole story when asked about both academics and religious-political views, and was negatively associated with lying to parents. Underclassmen reported a greater likelihood of justifying non-disclosure because of sadness and shame than upperclassmen, which was also associated with lower scores of moral judgment development. In turn upperclassmen reported a greater likelihood of justifying non-disclosure because of privacy, which was associated with higher scores of moral judgment development.
dc.format.extent 163 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Educational psychology
dc.subject.other Psychology
dc.subject.other Evolution & development
dc.title College students information management with parents and moral judgment development
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Educational Studies in Psychology, Research Methodology, and Counseling
etdms.degree.discipline Educational Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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