Evaluating the effectiveness of two teaching strategies to improve nursing students knowledge, skills, and attitudes in quality improvement and patient safety

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dc.contributor Dantzler, John A.
dc.contributor Graves, Barbara Ann
dc.contributor Houser, Rick
dc.contributor Kimble, Laura P.
dc.contributor.advisor Wright, Vivian H.
dc.contributor.author Maxwell, Karen Lynn
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T17:09:37Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T17:09:37Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0001640
dc.identifier.other Maxwell_alatus_0004D_11828
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/2094
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract In 1999, the Institute of Medicine published a report To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, which found that 44,000-98,000 people die as a result of preventable medical errors each year. Following this report in 2005, the Quality and Safety for Nurses (QSEN) project was established which defined a set of six core competencies that all nursing students should possess at graduation. Since the IOM report and the establishment of QSEN, nurse educators have been challenged with discovering effective teaching strategies to infuse the QSEN competencies into the nursing curricula. The purpose of the quantitative, pretest/post-test control group design study was to examine at the effectiveness of two teaching strategies, online modules in conjunction with a flipped classroom discussion seminar (experimental group) versus online modules only (control group), on baccalaureate-nursing students' knowledge, skills, and attitudes of the quality improvement (QI) and safety QSEN competencies. The online modules utilized in the study were developed by a group of experts through the Institute of Healthcare Improvement (IHI). Data were collected and analyzed using a sample of 64 senior baccalaureate-nursing students from one university in the southeastern United States that completed a web-based pre-test and post-test instrument with items adapted from two existing tools measuring QSEN competences. Two MANOVA analysis used to examine group differences demonstrated a statistically significant similar omnibus effect (p=.028) between the experimental group and the control group for knowledge, comfort of skills, and attitudes. A MANOVA examining group differences between the experimental group and the control group on knowledge, comfort with skills, and attitudes of patient safety was not statistically significant (p=.59).
dc.format.extent 156 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Nursing
dc.subject.other Pedagogy
dc.subject.other Education
dc.title Evaluating the effectiveness of two teaching strategies to improve nursing students knowledge, skills, and attitudes in quality improvement and patient safety
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ed.D.


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