The Atkins conundrum: deliberation, order effects, and an IQ score of 76

Show simple item record

dc.contributor.advisor Salekin, Karen L.
dc.contributor.author Chen, Debra R.
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T17:08:47Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T17:08:47Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0001589
dc.identifier.other Chen_alatus_0004D_11807
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/2043
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract This study examined the effect of deliberation, presence of an intelligence quotient (IQ) score of 76 in the claimant's history, and evidence presentation order on mock juror decisions in an Atkins case. Jurors read and heard a transcript based on a real Atkins case and were asked to determine if the claimant has intellectual disability (ID) and the degree to which they were convinced the claimant has ID. Jury deliberation was manipulated on two levels (deliberation and no deliberation); an IQ score of 76 in the claimant's history (high prior IQ) was manipulated on two levels (presence and absence); and evidence presentation order was manipulated on two levels (IQ evidence first with adaptive behavior (AB) evidence second and AB evidence first with IQ evidence second). Three possible moderating variables were studied (need for cognition (NFC), legal authoritarianism, and endorsement of negative attitudes toward and stereotypes about individuals with ID). A total of 209 mock jurors were divided into 40 juries with each jury consisting of five to eight jurors. Linear mixed modeling revealed that juries that deliberated were more convinced the claimant has ID than juries that did not deliberate. Analyses also indicated that there was a primacy effect for the IQ evidence but not the AB evidence. There was also an interaction between NFC and presence of a high prior IQ. In the absence of a high prior IQ, high-NFC and low-NFC individuals were equally convinced the claimant has ID. With a high prior IQ, high-NFC individuals were less convinced the claimant has ID than low-NFC individuals. Deliberation also reduced endorsement of stereotypes. These findings suggest that there may be group processes occurring during deliberation that reduce group bias.
dc.format.extent 352 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Psychology
dc.title The Atkins conundrum: deliberation, order effects, and an IQ score of 76
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


Files in this item

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Search DSpace


Browse

My Account