A comparison of parenting dimensions between mothers of children with Down syndrome and mothers of typically developing children

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dc.contributor Merrill, Edward C.
dc.contributor Gilpin, Ansley T.
dc.contributor Jarrett, Matthew A.
dc.contributor Barber, Angela B.
dc.contributor.advisor Conners, Frances A.
dc.contributor.advisor Curtner-Smith, Mary Elizabeth
dc.contributor.author Phillips, Belinda Allyson
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T17:08:31Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T17:08:31Z
dc.date.issued 2014
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0001545
dc.identifier.other Phillips_alatus_0004D_11878
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/2001
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Introduction: The purpose of the current study was to compare the parenting styles and dimensions in mothers of children with Down syndrome and mothers of typically developing children. Effective parenting is vital for a child's intellectual, physical, social, and emotional development, and not all parenting techniques are equal in their effectiveness in raising a healthy, well-adjusted child. We expected that parents of children with Down syndrome would display more negative parenting techniques than parents of typically developing children because of their decreased parental well-being and increased caregiving demands. Methods: The sample was comprised of 35 mothers of children with Down syndrome and 47 mothers of typically developing children. The mothers completed nine parent-report questionnaires asking about the way in which they parent their child, their child's cognitive and behavioral abilities, their own well-being, and the expectations and fears they have in relation to their child. Results: We found that mothers of children with Down syndrome use an authoritative parenting style less and a permissive parenting style more than mothers of typically developing children. Additionally, we found that mothers of children with Down syndrome provided their children with less structure but more chaos than mothers of typically developing children. However, these differences between groups on parenting styles and dimensions no longer existed when we included parental stress in the analyses. Finally, we found that within the Down syndrome group negative parenting dimensions were positively correlated with child behavior problems. Conclusion: The results suggested that mothers of children with Down syndrome are overall using similar parenting methods as mothers of typically developing children. All differences that do exist in parenting styles and dimensions can be accounted for by parental stress. As such, parenting interventions for parents of children with Down syndrome should be either focused on reducing parental stress in an effort to improve parenting techniques or on educating parents on how to utilize positive parenting techniques despite their stressful life circumstances.
dc.format.extent 179 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Psychology
dc.title A comparison of parenting dimensions between mothers of children with Down syndrome and mothers of typically developing children
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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