Understanding him in STEM: sharing the stories of African American male scholars in engineering academic programs at a predominantly white university

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dc.contributor Tomlinson, Stephen
dc.contributor Erevelles, Nirmala
dc.contributor Kuntz, Aaron M.
dc.contributor Hebson, Tim
dc.contributor.advisor Adams, Natalie G.
dc.contributor.author Hayes, Robert Eugene
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T16:46:49Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T16:46:49Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0001194
dc.identifier.other HayesIII_alatus_0004D_11527
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/1669
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Globalization of the world economy has confirmed the need for citizens to exemplify competitive capacities in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics fields. Since the 1970s, American higher education has seen increasing numbers of students entering college but has witnessed a decline in the number of students enrolling in STEM programs. African American men fall behind other students in regards to academic performance, persistence, and success throughout primary, secondary, and tertiary schooling. Accordingly, participation of African American men in STEM disciplines is low in comparison to White males and other race groups. Various factors have been identified as contributing to the academic failures of Black men. Poor academic and social preparedness, racial identity issues, institutional climates, negative stereotypes, and fear of success have been cited as potential contributors to the relative invisibility of African American men in STEM disciplines.This study explores the life stories of five African American male scholars in the college of engineering at a predominantly white university.The goal of the qualitative investigation is to help university faculty and administrators understand the institutional, interpersonal, and collective mechanisms influencing the success identities of African American male undergraduates in STEM academic programs. Understanding the lived experiences of this population may help universities innovate stronger supports for men of color in college and broaden the borders for all students interested in STEM careers.
dc.format.extent 340 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Sociology of education
dc.subject.other Higher education
dc.title Understanding him in STEM: sharing the stories of African American male scholars in engineering academic programs at a predominantly white university
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.discipline Educational Leadership, Policy, and Technology Studies
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name Ph.D.


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