Influence of occupational socialization on occupational identity and the perspectives and practices of the applied professor

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dc.contributor Sweaney, Daniel
dc.contributor Fulks, Jubal
dc.contributor Robinson, Thomas
dc.contributor Fader, Don
dc.contributor Houghtaling, Paul H.
dc.contributor Curtner-Smith, Matthew
dc.contributor.advisor Cummins, Linda
dc.contributor.author Avis, Lana
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T16:46:43Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T16:46:43Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0001182
dc.identifier.other Avis_alatus_0004D_11257
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/1658
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Studies of occupational socialization and occupational identity reveal that the pre-college years (acculturation stage of occupational socialization) have the most profound and lasting impact on individuals in medicine, law, law enforcement and physical education. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of occupational socialization on the perspectives and practices of two applied music professors considering both musician identity development and the artist-teacher philosophy. The purpose of this research was to explore the influences of the three stages of occupational socialization on musician identity formation and the perspectives and practices of two applied music professors, and to what extent these influences are reflected in the degree to which the applied music professors concur with G. James Daichendt's artist-teacher philosophy. The study used a qualitative approach to teacher identity as well as each professor's perspectives and practices. Data were collected through interviews, observations, and the twenty statements test. The data were analyzed using analytic induction and constant comparison. Key findings were: 1. The acculturation stage of occupational socialization has the greatest apparent influence on the identity orientation of applied music professors, 2. The perspectives and practices of the participating applied professors reflect their occupational socialization and occupational identity, and 3. The applied professor's identity orientation and occupational socialization are reflected in the level of adherence to G. James Daichendt's artist-teacher philosophy.
dc.format.extent 93 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Music
dc.subject.other Performing arts
dc.subject.other Sociology
dc.title Influence of occupational socialization on occupational identity and the perspectives and practices of the applied professor
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. School of Music
etdms.degree.discipline Music
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level doctoral
etdms.degree.name D.M.A.


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