An anthropological reconstruction of historic population movements in Tuscaloosa County using cemetery analysis

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dc.contributor Galbraith, Marysia H.
dc.contributor Bryan, Colgan Hobson
dc.contributor Jacobi, Keith P.
dc.contributor.advisor Brown, Ian W.
dc.contributor.author Burt, Hillary Suzanne
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T16:34:03Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T16:34:03Z
dc.date.issued 2012
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0000974
dc.identifier.other Burt_alatus_0004M_11161
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/1461
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract Data were gathered from 16 cemeteries in Tuscaloosa County, Alabama to see if historic population movements, like the Great Migration of African Americans from the rural areas of the South in the twentieth century, could be detected in cemeteries. To answer this question data were collected from White and Black cemeteries to understand the organization of family groups in cemeteries through the use of family plots and familial references. It was expected that Black cemeteries in rural areas would contain the fewest family plots and references, because this group was influenced by out-migration to the greatest extent. However, Black and White cemeteries in urban areas and White cemeteries in rural areas were expected to have the most family plots as these groups were less affected by out-migration. Numerous maps photographs, and data tables were compiled for each cemetery. White urban cemeteries had the most plots, Black urban cemeteries had the next highest, then White rural cemeteries, and Black rural cemeteries had the fewest plots. The plot counts from the cemeteries were then statistically analyzed based on the date of the plots and the location of the cemeteries. Interesting family burial patterns were also noted in some of the Black cemeteries that contained partially raised vault burials aligned in a stair-step pattern. Out-migration from the area appears to have prompted a decrease in family plots and the development of a new form of burial less reliant on stable immediate families in black cemeteries.
dc.format.extent 216 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Archaeology
dc.title An anthropological reconstruction of historic population movements in Tuscaloosa County using cemetery analysis
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Anthropology
etdms.degree.discipline Anthropology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level master's
etdms.degree.name M.A.


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