The role of pain catastrophizing and threat/harm appraisals in pain responsivity

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dc.contributor Ward, L. Charles
dc.contributor Crowther, Martha R.
dc.contributor.advisor Thorn, Beverly E.
dc.contributor.author Cunningham, Julie
dc.date.accessioned 2017-03-01T14:44:16Z
dc.date.available 2017-03-01T14:44:16Z
dc.date.issued 2011
dc.identifier.other u0015_0000001_0000661
dc.identifier.other Cunningham_alatus_0004M_10637
dc.identifier.uri https://ir.ua.edu/handle/123456789/1166
dc.description Electronic Thesis or Dissertation
dc.description.abstract The primary aim of this secondary data analysis was to examine the relation between pain catastrophizing and threat/harm appraisals and to determine if either construct uniquely predicts pain responsivity. An ancillary aim was to replicate race and sex differences in pain catastrophizing, threat/harm appraisals, and pain responsivity that have been previously found in the literature (Dixon, Thorn, & Ward, 2004; Osman, Barrios, Gutierrez, Kopper, Merrifield, & Grittmann, 2000). Analyses were performed on a dataset collected from 93 undergraduate students at the University of Alabama who completed the cold pressor task, an experimental pain manipulation, and then responded to the Composite Catastrophizing Measure (Clements, 2006). Statistical procedures included multivariate regression and two-way between-subjects analysis of variance. Together, pain catastrophizing and threat/harm appraisals predicted a small percent of the variance in pain intensity, but neither variable had any independent predictive ability. For tolerance, the combined model also predicted a small percent of variability. Here, pain catastrophizing and threat/harm appraisals each uniquely predicted tolerance times, although pain catastrophizing explained slightly more variance. No significant results were found in regards to this study's hypotheses surrounding race and sex differences in pain responsivity, catastrophizing, and threat/harm appraisals; this may be due to the small sample size and unequal cells. Findings from this study suggest that pain catastrophizing and threat/harm appraisals, while closely related, tap into unique aspects of pain-related maladaptive cognitions.
dc.format.extent 35 p.
dc.format.medium electronic
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf
dc.language English
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher University of Alabama Libraries
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Electronic Theses and Dissertations
dc.relation.ispartof The University of Alabama Libraries Digital Collections
dc.relation.hasversion born digital
dc.rights All rights reserved by the author unless otherwise indicated.
dc.subject.other Clinical psychology
dc.title The role of pain catastrophizing and threat/harm appraisals in pain responsivity
dc.type thesis
dc.type text
etdms.degree.department University of Alabama. Dept. of Psychology
etdms.degree.discipline Psychology
etdms.degree.grantor The University of Alabama
etdms.degree.level master's
etdms.degree.name M.A.


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